ERJ Brainteaser Results   

Brainiac2List of Brainteaser questions over the past couple of months, along with the answers and readers supplying correct replies. The number of correct answers, as well as speed and quality of reply will help decide the Brainiac of the Month.

 

OCTOBER 2018

 

Question 2: Boiler alert

The janitor of a block flats, notices that the boiler pressure is rising, and will shortly explode. He phones two of the residents, tells them the news, asks them to do the same and phone just two more people, and then get out of the building. Assume that each of the residents is in, and answers the phone immediately. If each phone call takes 30 seconds, and it takes each person 90 seconds to get out of the building, how long will it take to empty all 375 flats?

Answer: 7 minutes. There are 11 period of calls. 11 calls = 5 minutes 30 sec plus 1 minute 30 sec for the last people to leave the building. Well done to Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Jose Padron, Waterville TG Inc., Canada; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Brainteaser

 

Table by Jose Padron

 

Question 1: Water-jet

Our regulator technician is, this week, tasked with testing out a new rubber garden hose. The trajectory of the water-jet from the hose is shown in the diagram. From the information provided, can you work out the speed of the water-jet and the range R.

Answer: V = 14 m/s and R = 17m (see below). Well done to everyone who had a go at this really tricky question, and especially to Bharat B Sharma, Sr VP product development & technical service (elastomers), Reliance Industries Ltd, Gujarat, India; and Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA, who were spot-on with their answers. Also close, or on the right track, were: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH; and Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan.

 

SEPTEMBER

 

This has been the toughest ever selection process, with some great answering from readers around the world, over the last four weeks. But most particularly for the clever way he tackled Question 2, our judges have chosen Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld of PHP Fibers as our new Brainiac of the Month award. Congratulations to a very worthy winner, and everyone one else who came close to the top award.

 

Question 4: Bikes or trikes?

A technician fits 74 tires on to a total of 32 bicycles and tricycles. How many of them are bicycles and how many are tricycles?

Bonus question: Digital dilemma

X9543Y represents a six-digit number in which X and Y are digits different from each other. The number can be divided by both 8 and 11. What digit does A represent?

Answer: No flies on our readers this week, as our Brainiacs – both new and established – worked out that the tires were fitted on 22 bicycles and 10 tricycles, while for the bonus question B is 2 and A is 7.

Well done to: Michael Easton, sales and marketing director, Globus Group, Manchester, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Aneta Skowron, kierownik zespołu handlu/ head of trade office, Zakłady Chemiczne Siarkopol Tarnobrzeg sp. z.o.o., Tarnobrzeg, Poland; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Michele Girardi, Scame Mastaf Spa, Suisio, Italy; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Jose Padron, Waterville TG Inc., Canada; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; France Veillette, chef environnement, usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc. Canada; Tej Nath Dahal, rubber technologist, Nepal; Brandon Sa, head of connectivity, infotainment & e/e components, APAC Standardization PM (Interior & Electrical), FCA group, China.

 

Question 3: Counting sheep

On a visit to a sheep farm, a school group all entered a shed where there were 20 more children than sheep as well as an ants display, with exactly 10 times as many ants as children. In total, including the teacher, the children, the sheep and the ants there were 1,440 legs in the shed. How many children were in the group.

Answer: This one wasn’t too baa’d, though we had a complaint (sadly) that there were only three sheep on display at the farm – a damning indictment, perhaps, of the current state of the farming industry and/or our education system. Also liked the suggestion that there might be at least one fly in the shed.

Well done to everyone who had a go, but leading in our international flock with the correct answer – 23 children – were: David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd (see table below), UK; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Jose Padron, Waterville TG Inc., Canada; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; France Veillette, chef environnement, usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc. Canada; Andrew Knox, Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany; Michael Easton, sales and marketing director, Globus Group.

 

Question 2: Tricky total

Using only addition, subtraction, multiplication and/or division, how close can you get to making 952 from the numbers 100, 75, 50, 25, 6 and 3? You can only use each of these numbers once.

Answer: Well done to everyone who had a go, especially those who got very close to the target total. But top marks to the following readers for working out that 952 could actually be reached, as per Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld’s table below: Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan. Bharat B Sharma, senior VP, product development & technical service (Elastomers), Reliance Industries Ltd,Vadodara, Gujarat, India.

 

Question 1: May the fours be with you

Using four 4’s in each case, can you form all the numbers from 1 to 10 via addition, subtraction, multiplication and/or division? Parentheses can be used and the 4’s combined to make numbers such as 44 or 444.

Answer: Lots of great replies. We havn’t space to show them all, so let’s go with the answers (below) from Michele Girardi and Ralf Ortmayr – even though Ralf takes a bit of mathematical-licence by also using square-root and factorial functions.  A big well-done, in order of reply to: Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology,SI Group,  Béthune, France; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain;  Andrew Knox, Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Michele Girardi, Scame Mastaf Spa, Suisio, Italy; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno; Jose Padron, Waterville TG Inc., Canada; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany.

Michele Girardi:

1             4/4*4/4

2             4*4/(4+4)

3             (4*4-4)/4

4             4+4*(4-4)

5             (4+4*4)/4

6             4+(4+4)/4

7             4+4-4/4

8             4*4/4+4

9             4+4+4/4

10           (44-4)/4

Ralf Ortmayr:

0  =  4 ÷ 4 × 4 − 4  =   44 − 44

1  =  4 ÷ 4 + 4 − 4  =   44 ÷ 44

2  =  4 −(4 + 4)÷ 4  =  (44 + 4) ÷ 4!

3  = (4 × 4 − 4)÷ 4  =  (4 + 4 + 4) ÷ 4

4  =  4 + 4 ×(4 − 4) =  −44 + 4! + 4!

5  = (4 × 4 + 4)÷ 4  =  (44 − 4!) ÷ 4

6  = (4 + 4)÷ 4 + 4  =   4.4 + 4  ×.4

7  =  4 + 4 − 4 ÷ 4  =   44 ÷ 4  − 4

8  =  4 ÷ 4 × 4 + 4  =   4.4 − .4  + 4

9  =  4 ÷ 4 + 4 + 4  =   44 ÷ 4  − √4

10  =  4 ÷√4 + 4 ×√4  =  (44 − 4) ÷ 4

 

AUGUST

Traffic on a street at night

Well done to everyone who battled through all of our our questions in August, especially as there were points of debate with a couple of them. But for their fine efforts in tackling challenging Question 3, the joint winners this month’s Brainiac of the Month award are: Jose Padron, Waterville TG Inc.; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, PHP Fibers GmbH; Andrew Knox, Rubbond International; and Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd

 

Questions 5 (and 4): Missing number

What number is missing from the following series?

37, 10, 82

29, 11, 47

96,  ?   87

42,  6, 15

Bonus question (Question 4): Out of step

To keep fit, Frank liked to dash up the big circular staircase to his office on the third floor of the building. He goes up the steps 2, and sometimes 3, at a time but always finds 1 step left over when he gets to his landing. Indeed, Frank works out that no matter how many steps he is able to take at a time, there is always 1 step left over. How many steps are there on the stairs to Frank’s office, and what is the maximum number of steps Frank can take at a time.

Answers: Readers, it seemed, had little problem identifying 15 as the answer to the Missing Number question. However, the Out of Step teaser continued to generate alternative replies: but our judging panel’s ‘official’ answer is 61 steps and six at a time.

Let’s just move on and say a big well done to each of the following readers: Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Andrew Knox, Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Michele Girardi, Scame Mastaf Spa, Suisio, Italy; Jose Padron, Waterville TG Inc Canada; France Veillette, chef environnement, usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc. Canada; David Mann, manager rubber technology,SI Group,  Béthune, France; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Karl-Erik Lember, Motoral Eesti AS, Estonia; Henza Özşahin, deputy general manager, Özşahin, İstanbul, Turkey;.

 

Question 3: House numbers

Walking along the street where he lives, Simon notices that the sum of the house numbers up to his own house, but excluding it, equals the sum of the numbers of his house to the end of the road. If the houses are numbered consecutively, starting from 1, what are the possible numbers of Simon’s house? (There are less than 1000 houses on the road.)

Answer: As Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld neatly explained: With  3 houses, Simon has house # 3; With 20 houses, Simon has house # 15; With 119 houses, Simon has house # 85; and With 696 houses, Simon has house # 492

Quite a challenging teaser, so extremely well done to Jose Padron, materials development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada (see also his table below); and Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany. A special mention also – for getting most of the way along the street – to Andrew Knox of Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands and Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan.

Jose Padron BT answer

 

Question 2: Matching marbles

There are two identical bags. One bag has three green marbles and one white marble. The other has three white marbles and one green marble. After choosing a bag you draw one marble out at random. You notice it is green. You then put it back and draw another marble out of the same bag at random. What is the probability that the second marble drawn is green?

Answer: Near wipe-out this week as, among all the replies to roll in, only three were correct. The probability is 5/8, as per the equation Prob(X|Y)=Prob(X and Y)/Prob(Y). Exceptionally well done, so, to: Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; and Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; and Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany.

But a bit like the VAR in football, Andrew Knox of Rubbond International has asked us to review our answer. He makes the valid point that “the question is complicated by the wording “after chosing one bag”. Taken literally, there is no longer a chance you could chose the other bag, so strictly speaking there are two seperate probabilities remaining, namely 1/16 (being 1/4×1/4) and 9/16 (being 3/4×3/4), depending upon which bag you chose.”

 

Question 1: Lighter batch

Factory technician Ian has 10 batches of tires, all of which, but one, have tires weighing 100kg. One batch has tires weighing 90kg. Ian is allowed to use the scales only once. How can he spot the odd batch out?

 Answer: Click here to see special page carrying all answers to this weighty teaser, and very well done to: Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Andrew Knox, Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands; Michele Girardi, Scame Mastaf Spa, Suisio, Italy; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno, Canada; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Vilen Kancerov, export department director, SIA Latakko, Riga, Latvia; V Srinivasan, partner, 6T Services, India.

 

JULY 

600Trees2

From time to time, our judging panel is impressed by the contribution of particular countries to our global competition. This month, so, our congratulations and félicitations go to; France Veillette of Bridgestone, Thierry Montcalm, Soucy Techno and Jose Padron, Waterville TG of Canada – the new joint winners of our Brainiac of the Month title.

 

Question 4: Missing country

Answer: As correctly noted by Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, the missing country was Bangladesh, the largest population behind China, India and the US.

Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada S.A, Spain; Pedro Martinez- Zubieta, Sales Ops & Pricing Mgr Motorcycle EMEA, Goodyear Dunlop, Belgium; Fatima Bhatti, Polymer Access (Pvt) Ltd; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno, Canada; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Hyogo, Japan. Jury Sokolov, export department, Latakko, Latvia; and Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium.

 

Anderson-Seal-US-Trelleborg

 

Question 3: Rubber tappers

Two rubber tappers can each harvest the latex from a 3-acre section of plantation in 4 hours. How long will take them both to collect the rubber from a similar 5-acre section, if they work together and are joined by a trainee working at half their speed?

Answer: Bit of a tricky one, but as John Bowen concisely explained: Each tapper can tap 0.75 acre/hour, while the trainee can tap 0.375 rubber-content-NR-natural-RCMA-2acre/hour; working all together they can thus tap 1.875 acre/hour, so the time to tap 5 acres is 5/1.875 hours = 2.6667 hours, or 2 hours 40 minutes.

Well done in order of correct-answer arrival to: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology,SI Group Béthune, France; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; France Veillette, chef environnement, usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc. Canada; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno and Jose Padron, Waterville TG Inc.c Canada; Andrew Knox, Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands.

 

Question 2: In the can

A metal rod, shown as AB, rests inside a cylindrical can. The can is on a horizontal table. AC is a diameter of the base of the can. B is on the top edge of the can. BC is vertical. The radius of the base of the can is 5 cm. The volume of the can is 1178 cm3. What is the angle between the rod and the base of the can?

Canned heat

Answer: Readers had a ‘can-do’ attitude to this one, coming up with the answer, 56.3 degrees, in double-quick time. Well done in order of arrival to: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Bharat B Sharma, Relflex Elastomers, India; David Mann, manager rubber technology,SI Group Béthune, France; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada S.A, Spain; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Jose Padron, spécialiste en développement de materiaux, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; France Veillette, chef environnement, usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc., Canada; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Andrew Knox, Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands.

 

Question 1: Party puzzle

Some time ago one of our contestants phoned to say that he was planning a big party to celebrate winning the Brainiac of the Month award, asking: “Can you work out how many bottles of champagne I have in my fridge?” He then gave three clues: If the number of bottles of champagne I have: 1, is a multiple of 5, it is a number between 1 and 19; 2, is not a multiple of 8, it is a number between 20 and 29; 3, is not a multiple of 10, it is a number between 30 and 39. How many bottles of champagne did our exuberant reader have in his fridge?

Answer: As David Mann correctly explained the only number that meets the combination of conditions is 32 bottles of champagne (or maybe two Balthazars).

Correct answers flowed in, in the following order, from: Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK: Michele Girardi, Scame Mastaf Spa, Suisio, Italy; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Andrew Knox, Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands; David Mann, manager rubber technology,SI Group Béthune, France; France Veillette, chef environnement, usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc., Canada; Well done to all and everyone else who had a go!

 

JUNE 

CropLightening

With some smart, new players joining our Brainteaser competition this month, no-one – not even our uber-Brainiacs – can rest on their laurels (or any other living organism). And, for his excellent answer to our Football Fever question, congratulations to

                                       Jose Padron of Waterville TG, now a two-in-a-row Brainiac of the Month

 

Question 4: Blue is the colour

There are 5 red counters and x blue counters in a bag. If 2 counters are taken out at random, the probability that both are red is 5/33. How many blue counters are in the bag?

Answer, as neatly shown by Stephen Fulton: 5/y * 4/(y-1) = 5/33 where y = total of balls in the bag.  Total = 12 and so the number of blue balls = 7

Correct replies arrived in, in the following order, from: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology,SI Group, Béthune, France; Michele Girardi, Scame Mastaf Spa, Suisio, Italy; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Andrew Knox, Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager Soucy Techno, Canada. Well done to all.

 

Question 3: Ten tire teaser

Conti-tire-factory-curing2-generic-729x346There are 10 factories producing off-road tires. The second factory produces twice as many as the first. The third and fourth each produce 80 more than the first. The fifth produces twice as many as the second. The sixth produces 40 more than the fifth. The seventh and eighth each produce 40 less than the fifth. The ninth produces 80 more than the second. The tenth produces nothing owing to a shortage of materials. If the sum of the production equals 11,700, what does the first factory produce?

Answer: Okay, the answer was straightforward – the first factory produces 500 tires – but readers came up with so many amazing ways of working this out. Well done to: Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada S.A, Spain; David Mann, manager rubber technology, Béthune, France; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno, Canada; Jose Padron, spécialiste en développement de materiaux, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Randa Tharwat, import manager, Nacita, Cairo. Egypt; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; France Veillette, chef environnement, usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc., Canada; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA.

The fanciest (most complicated) solution, though, came in from Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK:

 First, we can put the question into a table “as is” to see what’s going on.

Ten Factory Teaser Table 1 

*We can ignore Factory Ten completely. Working backwards we can calculate that a=2x and b=4x

Next we can simplify all of the equations so that they relate to x

Ten Factory Teaser Table 2

We can then simplify this further and then reverse it to solve for x, where y = the total tires produced by all factories.

y=23x+200 Therefore; x=(y-200)/23  In the case of this question: x=(11,700-200)/23 So x= 11,500/23 ie 500 – Well done!

 

Question 2: Football fever

synthetic-turf-footballHow many living things (organisms) can you identify on the official flags of the 32 countries competing in the World Cup 2018 football finals in Russia?

Bonus question: How many of the countries that got through to the World Cup 2018 football finals have blue as a prominent colour on their official flags?

Answers:  Some great replies to our first question but nobody could match the quality of the detailed answer provided by Jose Padron (see below). Unfortunately, no one spotted the trick element to our Bonus Question: blue is a prominent (okay ‘dominant’) colour on the Russian flag, but as host country it qualified automatically and so did not actually ‘get through’ to the World Cup finals. That left 13 countries: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Columbia, Costa Rica, Croatia, France, Iceland, Panama, Russia, Serbia, South Korea, Sweden, Uruguay.

So well done to: Fatima Bhatti, Polymer Access (Pvt) Ltd, Karachi, Pakistan; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany.

But our clear winner is rising star Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada for this top-notch answer:

There are seven (7) animals on the official flags: goat, leopard, marten sable, eagle, lion, serpent and vicuña (vicugna)There are eight (8) plants or trees: Oyster plant leaves, Lily flowers (fleur-de-lys), Cactus (Pear Cactus), Southern Live Oak leaves, Bay leaves (Laurel), Palm branch, Holm Oak leaves, Chinchona tree (Quinquina)

There are six countries with living things Croatia, Egypt, Spain, Mexico, Peru, and Serbia.

Detailed description:

  1. Croatia; Goat, Leopard heads, Marten Sable
  2. Egypt; Eagle
  3. Spain; Lion, Oyster plant leaves, Lilly flowers(fleur-de-lys)
  4. Mexico; Eagle, Serpent, Cactus (Pear Cactus), Southern Live Oak leaves, Bay leaves (Laurel)
  5. Peru; Vicuña (Vicugna), Palm branch, Holm Oak leaves, Chinchona tree (Quinquina)
  6. Serbia; Eagle (two heads), Lily flowers (fleur-de-lys).

 

Question 1: Awkward angle

BT2Shape

The diagram shows a quadrilateral JKLM. What is the size of angle KLM?

Answer: Angle KLM is 33.6954°, or as explained neatly by John Bowen: length MK = Sq Rt[4.5*4.5] + [7*7] =8.32, so Sin KLM =8.32/14 =0.55478 so KLM = 34deg [approx]. Well done to: David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge Belgium.

 

MAY

BTSky X generic

There were a number of readers who dealt really well with the  tricky questions in our latest Brainteaser series. But, for their speed and accuracy, our judging team decided that our top award should go to:

John BowenPaul Knutson and Jose Padron the new joint holders of the Brainiac of the Month title.

 

Question 4: Shape shifter

White shapes and black shapes are used in a game: some are circles, the rest squares.
The ratio of the number of white shapes to the number of black shapes is 3:7
The ratio of the number of white circles to the number of white squares is 4:5
The ratio of the number of black circles to the number of black squares is 2:5
What fraction of all the shapes are circles?

Answer: A third of the shapes were circles. Well done to: Michele Girarde, Scame Mastaf SpA, Suisio, Italy; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno, Canada; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA;

 

Question 3: Sands of time

Sarah is on an organised walking tour across the Sahara dessert. On the first day, she only travels 7km. On the final day, she travels 51km increasing her journey by 4km each day. How many days does she travel and how far?

michelin shoesAnswer: Well done to Sarah for walking 348 miles in 12 days, and to: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Fatima Bhatti, Polymer Access (Pvt) Ltd, Karachi, Pakistan; Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge Belgium; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA; France Veillette, chef environnement, Usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc., Canada: Dr. Jens Kiesewetter, director applied technology tire & rubber, Evonik Resource Efficiency GmbH, Wesseling, Germany; Steven J Forget, calendering specialist, Goodyear Valleyfield, Canada; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Hyogo, Japan.

 

Question 2: Rectangular riddle

Find the length and width of a rectangle, where: The length of the rectangle is the same as the length of each side of a square. The length of the rectangle is 4cm more than 3 times the width of the rectangle. The area of the square is 66 cm2 more than the area of the rectangle.

5. ABB EOW crop2 eraseAnswer: Some experts on our judging team thought this one might prove a bit tricky. However, the following readers had no problem working out the correct answer; length 9cm and width 1.67cm. Well done to: Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Hyogo, Japan; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge Belgium; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno, Canada;

 

Question 1: Ducks Vs Rabbits

At the end of the first half of the basketball game, the Rubber Rabbits and the Rubber Ducks were tied at 24 points. Each team had scored 12 baskets, including at least oneduck each of 1-, 2-, and 3-point baskets. However, the Ducks had made more 3-point baskets than the Rabbits. The Rabbits had scored an equal number of 1-, 2-, and 3-point baskets. How many 1-, 2-, and 3-point baskets did each team score?

Answer: Can’t wait for the second half. The Rabbits got four 1-pointers, four 2-pointers and four 3-pointers, while the Ducks scored five1-point, two 2-point and five 3-point scores. Well done to: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno, Canada; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge Belgium; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Hyogo, Japan; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA.

 

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