Brainiac2

ERJ Brainteaser Results   

Brainiac2List of Brainteaser questions over the past couple of months, along with the answers and readers supplying correct replies. The number of correct answers, as well as speed and quality of reply will help decide the Brainiac of the Month.

 

July 2018

Anderson-Seal-US-Trelleborg

Question 2: In the can

 

A metal rod, shown as AB, rests inside a cylindrical can. The can is on a horizontal table. AC is a diameter of the base of the can. B is on the top edge of the can. BC is vertical. The radius of the base of the can is 5 cm. The volume of the can is 1178 cm3. What is the angle between the rod and the base of the can?

Canned heat

Answer: Readers had a ‘can-do’ attitude to this one, coming up with the answer, 56.3 degrees, in double-quick time. Well done in order of arrival to: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Bharat B Sharma, Relflex Elastomers, India; David Mann, manager rubber technology,SI Group Béthune, France; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada S.A, Spain; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Jose Padron, spécialiste en développement de materiaux, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; France Veillette, chef environnement, usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc., Canada; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Andrew Knox, Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands.

 

 

Question 1: Party puzzle

 

Some time ago one of our contestants phoned to say that he was planning a big party to celebrate winning the Brainiac of the Month award, asking: “Can you work out how many bottles of champagne I have in my fridge?” He then gave three clues: If the number of bottles of champagne I have: 1, is a multiple of 5, it is a number between 1 and 19; 2, is not a multiple of 8, it is a number between 20 and 29; 3, is not a multiple of 10, it is a number between 30 and 39. How many bottles of champagne did our exuberant reader have in his fridge?

Answer: As David Mann correctly explained the only number that meets the combination of conditions is 32 bottles of champagne (or maybe two Balthazars).

Correct answers flowed in, in the following order, from: Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK: Michele Girardi, Scame Mastaf Spa, Suisio, Italy; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Andrew Knox, Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands; David Mann, manager rubber technology,SI Group Béthune, France; France Veillette, chef environnement, usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc., Canada; Well done to all and everyone else who had a go!

 

JUNE 2018

CropLightening

With some smart, new players joining our Brainteaser competition this month, no-one – not even our uber-Brainiacs – can rest on their laurels (or any other living organism). And, for his excellent answer to our Football Fever question, congratulations to

                                       Jose Padron of Waterville TG, now a two-in-a-row Brainiac of the Month

 

Question 4: Blue is the colour

There are 5 red counters and x blue counters in a bag. If 2 counters are taken out at random, the probability that both are red is 5/33. How many blue counters are in the bag?

Answer, as neatly shown by Stephen Fulton: 5/y * 4/(y-1) = 5/33 where y = total of balls in the bag.  Total = 12 and so the number of blue balls = 7

Correct replies arrived in, in the following order, from: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology,SI Group, Béthune, France; Michele Girardi, Scame Mastaf Spa, Suisio, Italy; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Andrew Knox, Rubbond International, Ohé en Laak, The Netherlands; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager Soucy Techno, Canada. Well done to all.

 

Question 3: Ten tire teaser

Conti-tire-factory-curing2-generic-729x346There are 10 factories producing off-road tires. The second factory produces twice as many as the first. The third and fourth each produce 80 more than the first. The fifth produces twice as many as the second. The sixth produces 40 more than the fifth. The seventh and eighth each produce 40 less than the fifth. The ninth produces 80 more than the second. The tenth produces nothing owing to a shortage of materials. If the sum of the production equals 11,700, what does the first factory produce?

Answer: Okay, the answer was straightforward – the first factory produces 500 tires – but readers came up with so many amazing ways of working this out. Well done to: Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada S.A, Spain; David Mann, manager rubber technology, Béthune, France; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno, Canada; Jose Padron, spécialiste en développement de materiaux, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Randa Tharwat, import manager, Nacita, Cairo. Egypt; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; France Veillette, chef environnement, usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc., Canada; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA.

The fanciest (most complicated) solution, though, came in from Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK:

 First, we can put the question into a table “as is” to see what’s going on.

Ten Factory Teaser Table 1 

*We can ignore Factory Ten completely. Working backwards we can calculate that a=2x and b=4x

Next we can simplify all of the equations so that they relate to x

Ten Factory Teaser Table 2

We can then simplify this further and then reverse it to solve for x, where y = the total tires produced by all factories.

y=23x+200 Therefore; x=(y-200)/23  In the case of this question: x=(11,700-200)/23 So x= 11,500/23 ie 500 – Well done!

 

Question 2: Football fever

synthetic-turf-footballHow many living things (organisms) can you identify on the official flags of the 32 countries competing in the World Cup 2018 football finals in Russia?

Bonus question: How many of the countries that got through to the World Cup 2018 football finals have blue as a prominent colour on their official flags?

Answers:  Some great replies to our first question but nobody could match the quality of the detailed answer provided by Jose Padron (see below). Unfortunately, no one spotted the trick element to our Bonus Question: blue is a prominent (okay ‘dominant’) colour on the Russian flag, but as host country it qualified automatically and so did not actually ‘get through’ to the World Cup finals. That left 13 countries: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Columbia, Costa Rica, Croatia, France, Iceland, Panama, Russia, Serbia, South Korea, Sweden, Uruguay.

So well done to: Fatima Bhatti, Polymer Access (Pvt) Ltd, Karachi, Pakistan; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany.

But our clear winner is rising star Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada for this top-notch answer:

There are seven (7) animals on the official flags: goat, leopard, marten sable, eagle, lion, serpent and vicuña (vicugna)There are eight (8) plants or trees: Oyster plant leaves, Lily flowers (fleur-de-lys), Cactus (Pear Cactus), Southern Live Oak leaves, Bay leaves (Laurel), Palm branch, Holm Oak leaves, Chinchona tree (Quinquina)

There are six countries with living things Croatia, Egypt, Spain, Mexico, Peru, and Serbia.

Detailed description:

  1. Croatia; Goat, Leopard heads, Marten Sable
  2. Egypt; Eagle
  3. Spain; Lion, Oyster plant leaves, Lilly flowers(fleur-de-lys)
  4. Mexico; Eagle, Serpent, Cactus (Pear Cactus), Southern Live Oak leaves, Bay leaves (Laurel)
  5. Peru; Vicuña (Vicugna), Palm branch, Holm Oak leaves, Chinchona tree (Quinquina)
  6. Serbia; Eagle (two heads), Lily flowers (fleur-de-lys).

 

Question 1: Awkward angle

BT2Shape

The diagram shows a quadrilateral JKLM. What is the size of angle KLM?

Answer: Angle KLM is 33.6954°, or as explained neatly by John Bowen: length MK = Sq Rt[4.5*4.5] + [7*7] =8.32, so Sin KLM =8.32/14 =0.55478 so KLM = 34deg [approx]. Well done to: David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge Belgium.

 

MAY

BTSky X generic

There were a number of readers who dealt really well with the  tricky questions in our latest Brainteaser series. But, for their speed and accuracy, our judging team decided that our top award should go to:

John BowenPaul Knutson and Jose Padron the new joint holders of the Brainiac of the Month title.

 

Question 4: Shape shifter

White shapes and black shapes are used in a game: some are circles, the rest squares.
The ratio of the number of white shapes to the number of black shapes is 3:7
The ratio of the number of white circles to the number of white squares is 4:5
The ratio of the number of black circles to the number of black squares is 2:5
What fraction of all the shapes are circles?

Answer: A third of the shapes were circles. Well done to: Michele Girarde, Scame Mastaf SpA, Suisio, Italy; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno, Canada; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA;

 

Question 3: Sands of time

Sarah is on an organised walking tour across the Sahara dessert. On the first day, she only travels 7km. On the final day, she travels 51km increasing her journey by 4km each day. How many days does she travel and how far?

michelin shoesAnswer: Well done to Sarah for walking 348 miles in 12 days, and to: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Fatima Bhatti, Polymer Access (Pvt) Ltd, Karachi, Pakistan; Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge Belgium; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA; France Veillette, chef environnement, Usine de Joliette, Bridgestone Canada Inc., Canada: Dr. Jens Kiesewetter, director applied technology tire & rubber, Evonik Resource Efficiency GmbH, Wesseling, Germany; Steven J Forget, calendering specialist, Goodyear Valleyfield, Canada; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Hyogo, Japan.

 

Question 2: Rectangular riddle

Find the length and width of a rectangle, where: The length of the rectangle is the same as the length of each side of a square. The length of the rectangle is 4cm more than 3 times the width of the rectangle. The area of the square is 66 cm2 more than the area of the rectangle.

5. ABB EOW crop2 eraseAnswer: Some experts on our judging team thought this one might prove a bit tricky. However, the following readers had no problem working out the correct answer; length 9cm and width 1.67cm. Well done to: Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Hyogo, Japan; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge Belgium; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno, Canada;

 

Question 1: Ducks Vs Rabbits

At the end of the first half of the basketball game, the Rubber Rabbits and the Rubber Ducks were tied at 24 points. Each team had scored 12 baskets, including at least oneduck each of 1-, 2-, and 3-point baskets. However, the Ducks had made more 3-point baskets than the Rabbits. The Rabbits had scored an equal number of 1-, 2-, and 3-point baskets. How many 1-, 2-, and 3-point baskets did each team score?

Answer: Can’t wait for the second half. The Rabbits got four 1-pointers, four 2-pointers and four 3-pointers, while the Ducks scored five1-point, two 2-point and five 3-point scores. Well done to: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Thierry Montcalm, R&D and innovation manager, Soucy Techno, Canada; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge Belgium; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Hyogo, Japan; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA.

 

APRIL

600Kew flowers

With respect to all our other great contestants, there is one standout winner this time around. For single-handedly defeating our question-master in week 2 and 3, huge congratulations go to:

                                    Yuichi (Joe) Sano our new Brainiac of the Month.

 

Question 5: Cake-cutting challenge

Food-genericTo celebrate being the first two people in their department to answer the brainteaser correctly, Ian and Arthur order in a cake in the shape of a cone. The radius of the base of the cone is 8cm and the height of the cone is 20cm. The cake is to be cut horizontally – as shown in diagram – into two pieces of equal volume. How high above the base should the cake be cut?

Answer: Not such a piece of cake this week, as we had quite a few wrong answers. Well done so to the following readers, who worked out that the cake should be cut 4.126 cm –   20*20*20=2*(20-x)*(20-x)*(20-x) – above the base: David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK;  Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami Works, special steel wire division; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge Belgium.

 

Question 4: Chance en-counter 3

170517_Troester_HV-Cable_Rendering_Img 600 genericAnswer:  Great to be back on track: for a short while it seemed that readers had blown a fuse after Guinness and other recent questions. The answer this week was, as Thierry Montcalm worked out: 6/9)*(5/8)*(4/7)+(6/9)*(3/7)*(2/6)+(3/9)*(6/8)*(2/7)+(3/9)*(2/8)*(6/7) = 228/504 or 19/42 or 45.24%.

Well done in order of answer-arrival to: Thierry Montcalm, R&D Chemist, Soucy Techno, Canada; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge Belgium; Paul Knutson, textile, engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami Works, special steel wire division.

 

Question 3: Missing Link

After almost a year without a problem, Simon has once more forgotten the code for the combination lock on his bicycle. MobikesHe has written it down on a piece of paper, but the second number has been erased. Help Simon to get back home by working out the number missing from the code-sequence

6. _ , 15, 16, 23, 24.

Clues given during the week: Try adding prime numbers…Then easy as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5… The answer is not 7… The next two numbers in the sequence are 31 and 32.

Dow-bike-tireAnswer: Sorry, if our teaser turned out more difficult that we expected again this week. But, once more proving that it could be done was Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan. This, as he identified, was a sequence in which the next two prime numbers were added. So you get 6 (1 + 2 + 3); then the missing number 10 ( 2 + 3 + 5); followed by 15 (3 + 5 + 7); 16 (4 + 5 + 7); 23 (5 + 7 + 11); and 24 (6 + 7 + 11)…

Seems like Simon might well have a long walk home and should next time set an easier code to work out…

 

Question 2: Coded message

What does this coded message say?

d e i a o b n s t r t e h a e r

generic bubblesAnswer: For the first time ever, our teaser has beaten the best brains in the rubber industry – with one exception. Extra well done to Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan who decoded the hidden message behind this Caeser code as: ‘do the brainteaser’

Bonus question: What links the following numbers?:

1759, 232, 30,000,000, 1725

Answer: Pure genius again from Yuichi, who was also the only reader to work out ‘Guinness’ as the answer to our Bonus question.

Guinness adSt. James’s Gate brewery was founded in 1759 in Dublin, Ireland, by Arthur Guinness. He was born in 1725. In the production process, barley is roasted at 232 degrees C to help give the drink is distinctive colour and flavour. There are an estimated 30 million bubbles in each pint of Guinness - key to its creamy texture. This is due to the introduction of nitrogen into the beer, via a revolutionary keg design developed in the 1950s by Cambridge-educated mathematician Michael Ash.

 

Question 1: What time?

Complete the time sequence: 12:03; 11:14; 09:26; 06:39…

PNETPEAnswer: Some alternative replies, but our judges would only accept 2:53 as the correct answer. While small in number, our select group of ‘winners’ are from three different continents. Well done in order of reply to: David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge Belgium; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA.

 

 

MARCH 2018

600wintersunset2

There were some strong candidate for our top award this time, but what impressed our panel most were some clever alternative answers given for Question 3.

Congratulations, therefore, to: Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld of PHP Fibers, our new Brainiac of the Month!

 

Question 4: Dave’s donuts

Dave likes donuts a lot but has gone on a diet. He now aims to eat less than 30 donuts a week. So, on Monday, he ate some donuts; on Tuesday, half as many as on Monday; On Wednesday, 5 donuts less than Tuesday; and on Thursday, 9 donuts. For the final three days, Dave ate no donuts at all. If Dave met his target of eating less than 30 that week, what is the biggest number of donuts he could have eaten on Monday?

Answer: The correct number was 12, for this, not our most difficult (or healthiest) ever, teaser, However, still made for a tidy equation, as sent in by Yuichi Sano: x+0.5x+(0.5x-5)+9<30.

Well done to: David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Andrew Beasley, product analyst, Hankook Tyre UK Ltd, UK; Jon Cutler, materials development manager, Trelleborg Sealing Solutions Tewkesbury, UK; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan.; Randa Tharwat, import manager, Nacita Automotive, Cairo, Egypt.

 

Question 3: Not 2 easy

Using any combination of mathematical signs, symbols and/or functions, can you make 5 using only two 2s?

Answer: Never mind the ‘correct’ answer (displayed below), some readers also came up with some more inventive solutions. Among these was Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld’s 2 + 2 + (pi/pi), 2+2-cos(pi) and even holding a mirror up to the final ‘2’. There was also a neat 20 /.2 from Paul Knutson…

Uploaded 21 MAr Brainteaser answer

Our Bonus Question, asking readers to identify the missing country, was more straightforward:

Korea – Ban Ki-Moon; Ghana – Kofi Annan; Egypt – Boutros Boutros-Ghali; Peru – Javier Peres de Cuellar; Austria – Kurt Waldheim

A great effort this week from: Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan. Well done!

 

Question 2: Missing letter

Find the missing letter in the following sequence:

B, _ S, V, T, SLC, N, L…

Answer: Like an Olympic ski run, some got there in record time, others trailed in a bit later, a few didn’t finish at all. A special mention – not for the first time – to David Mann, who spotted within minutes that this represented a list of locations for the Winter Olympics, with P for Pyeongchang, South Korea missing from the letter sequence.

Well done to: David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Jon Cutler, materials development manager, Trelleborg Sealing Solutions Tewkesbury, UK; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Canada; Tom Bell, marketing & business services in elastomers, S & T Group LLC, Houston, Texas, USA; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA.

 

Question 1: Rubber ball

A rubber ball is dropped from a distance of nine metres from the floor, and continues to bounce. Each time it bounces back two thirds of the distance of the previous bounce. How far will the ball travel before it stops?

Answer: Not our toughest, but still a few  quite a few readers were off-the-mark. Well done to everyone here, who correctly replied 45 metres – or as Yuichi Sano explained 9/(1-2/3)x2-9: Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Michael Simpson, research & development engineer, Trelleborg AVS, Leicester, UK; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Canada; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Randa Tharwat, import manager, Nacita Automotive, Cairo, Egypt; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany;

 

FEBRUARY

600Trees lake

This month’s award goes to a reader who has been in or around pole position since we launched our Brainteaser competition. Congratulations to:

                                                   Industry consultant John Bowen our new Brainiac of the Month

 

Question 5: Average EV

An electric vehicle, with a mass of 600kg, starts from rest and accelerates to reach a velocity of 30 m/s in seven seconds. Assuming the motors and transmission are 100% efficient, approximately what is the average power transferred from the battery during this time?

Answer: Not sure we should have ended up five questions in February. Anyway, this one proved much trickier than expected, with only four of our top experts coming up with the correct answer 38.6 kW. As David Mann explained: kinetic energy gained = ½ mass (velocity)2 = 0.5 x 600 x 900 = 270000 Joule. Therefore, average energy output (power) = energy / time = 270000 / 7 = 38.6kW.

Extra well done, so, this week to: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Canada; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA.

 

Question 4: Prime problem

How many prime numbers can you find between 1 and 100 that are simultaneously one greater than a multiple of four and one less than a multiple of five?

Answer: 29 and 89, or as Ian Brooker explained:  29-1=28 (4×7); 29+1=30 (5×6) and 89-1=88 (4×22);89+1=90 (5×18)

Well done to: Jon Cutler, materials development manager, Trelleborg Sealing Solutions, Tewkesbury, UK; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH  Obernburg, Germany; Ian. P. Jones, managing director, Continental, Contitech power transmission group, ContiTech United Kingdom Ltd, Wigan, UK; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group,  Béthune, France; Aneta Skowron, kierownik zespołu handlu, Zakłady Chemiczne “Siarkopol” Tarnobrzeg sp. z o.o., Poland; Paul Knutson,  textile engineer, Timkin Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA,  Magy Adib, import specialst and Sara Wagdy, import supervisor, Nacita, Cairo, Egypt; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Canada; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd. Hyogo, Japan.

 

Question 3: Missing number

Complete the sequence below:

2 + 3 = 8

3 + 7 = 27

4 + 5 = 32

5 + 8 = 60

6 + 7 = 72

7 + 8 = ?

Answer: There seems to be quite a few codebreakers among ERJ readers as this proved to be one of the most popular teasers in recent months. Well done to everyone who came up with the correct answer, 98: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Aneta Skowron, kierownik zespołu handle, Zakłady Chemiczne “Siarkopol” Tarnobrzeg sp. z o.o., Poland; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Dimitri Aslanidis, business & technology development, AMS Forces, Belgium; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Canada; Kho Irani, Vistalon market development, speciality elastomers & butyl, ExxonMobil Chemicals, Springwoods Village Parkway Spring, Texas, USA;  Maxime Vandewiele, trading rubber, Sogescol, Switzerland; Michael Easton, sales and marketing director, Globus Group, Manchester, UK; Yehia Abd El Whab, Eldelta Tires;  Tomi Pekkola, sales director, Black Donuts Engineering Inc., Finland; Mahendra Modi, licensing & technology director, Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Houston, Texas, USA; Jon Cutler, materials development manager, Trelleborg Sealing Solutions Tewkesbury, UK; Sara Wagdy, import supervisor, Nacita Automotive, Cairo, Egypt; Randa Tharwat, import manager, Nacita Automotive. Downtown. Cairo, Egypt

 

Question 2: Near miss

Two autonomous vehicles are being trialled at different ends of a straight stretch of motorway. However, due to a computer malfunction, both test teams lose control and the vehicles enter a collision course at 65km apart. The north-bound car is traveling at 55km/hr and the south-bound car at 80km/hr. Luckily, the teams manage to stop both cars simultaneously, exactly two minutes before collision. What is the distance between the vehicles when they stop?

Answer: As Thierry Montcalm nicely explained, the cars were 4.5 km apart ((55km/h+80km/h)X(2 min)X(1/60 h/min). An extra mention also to Jose Padron who provided his own bonus answers, including; if they stop only a third of a second before collision; the distance between the two vehicles should be just 12.5 metres.

Anyway, well done to in order of reply to: David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Dejan (Dan) Andjelkovic, technical director – industrial solutions, The Hallstar Company, Bedford Park, Illinois, USA;  Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Ioan Masec, technician, rubber mill, Mitas a.s., Praha, Čzech Republic; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Canada.

Thanks for your patience during the scheduled maintenance holiday for our Brainiac supercomputer.

 

Question 1: Chance en-counter

There are 10 coloured counters in a box. If two counters are picked out at random, the probablity of them both being blue is 2/15. How many of the coloured counters in the box are blue? There was also a bonus Question: A technician wrote down a sequence of six two-digit numbers from a tire rotating on a test rig: Find the missing number.: 16, 06, 68, 88, _, 98.

Answer: Readers were in fine form: working out that there were 4 blue counters (x(x-1)/(9*10) = 2/15), with most also spotting that the sequence was 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91 – when the tire stopped spinning.

Well done to: David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Canada; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany; Robert van Herwaarden, production director, AEGIR-Marine Group, The Netherlands: Yuichi (Joe) Sano, Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd, Itami, Japan.

 

JANUARY

MICHELIN WINTER TESTING _IVALO_© MICHELIN 600

Well done to all for a quick return to form after the holiday break. But, for his rapid-fire reply to tricky Question 2, there can only be one winner of this month’s top title. Big congratulation to

   

                                   David Mann, our first Brainiac of the Month of 2018.

 

Question 4: Old timer

At a celebration marking a rubber trading company’s 100th year, former chairman Mr. Tim remarked that his grandson was about as old in days as his son was in weeks. The grandson, the retired chairman added, was also as many months old as he was in years. Together, the three family members were 140 years old. How old was Mr Tim?

Answer: Mr Tim was 84 years old (his son 49 and grandson 7). Correct answers arrived in, in the following order, from: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH,Obernburg, Germany; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Fatima Bhatti, Polymer Access (Pvt) Ltd, Karachi, Pakistan; Ian Brooker, HB Chemical Corp., Twinsburg, Ohio, USA; Ralf Ortmayr, senior pricing analyst, Toyo Tire Europe GmbH, Willich, Germany. Well done.

 

Question 3: Old house

Mathematician Steve was musing that his house was built on 1 Jan,1978, and saw that if he added the first two digits (19) to the last two (78), the total was the same as the middle two digits (97). Assuming it is still standing, how old would Steve’s house be when the year next had this same property?

Answer: Yes, let’s hope Steve’s house is well-built as the year would be 2307 – making the answer 329 years. Thanks also to Jose Padron for providing a ‘bonus answer’: this mathematical rule will be repeated each 110 years, before changing a millennium: 2417, 2527, 2637, 2747, 2857, 2967.

Well done to: Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; Fatima Bhatti, Polymer Access (Pvt) Ltd, Karachi, Pakistan; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Jose Padron, material development specialist, Waterville TG Inc., Waterville, Québec, Canada; Paul Knutson, textile engineer, Timken Belts, Springfield, Missouri, USA.

 

Question 2: Missing letters

Fill in the gaps in the following letter-pairs:

D_, B_, G_, B_, G_, R_, J_

(To help, we added some of the letters during the week)

(Bonus question: What feature have the following six-letter words in common?: abhors, almost, bijoux, billow, chintz, effort?)

Answer: Initials of the names of US presidents DT, BO, GB, BC, GB, RR, JC – Donald Trump, Barack Obama, George Bush, Bill Clinton, George Bush, Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter - while the words in the Bonus question had their letters in alphabet order.

Extra well done to David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France who came up both answers within minutes on Monday morning. He was followed soon after by John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Jon Cutler, materials development manager, Trelleborg Sealing Solutions, Tewkesbury, UK. Well done also to Fatima Bhatti, Polymer Access (Pvt) Ltd, Karachi, Pakistan who answered our Bonus question straight away.

 

Question 1: Shared birthdays

For a company survey, HR executive Simon has established that birthdays in the workforce are spread equally over a 365-day year. Using a random selection process, how many employees does he need to select before the chance of two or more of them sharing a birthday (eg 2 January), is greater than 50%?

Answer: Firstly Happy New Year to everyone. This was fairly straightforward starter for 2018: to have more than a 50% chance of 2 people with the same birthdate in any year you need 23 people. Getting off on the right foot were: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Hans-Bernd Lüchtefeld, market research & communication manager, PHP Fibers GmbH, Obernburg, Germany; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK.

 

Brainteaser Results Dec – July 2017

 

Previous Brainteaser Results