Brainiac2

ERJ Brainteaser Results   

List of Brainteaser questions over the past couple of months, along with the answers and readers supplying correct replies. The number of correct answers, as well as speed and quality of reply will help decide the Brainiac of the Month.

 

FEBRUARY 2017

synthetic-turf-football

 

Question 2: Title total teaser

If, with some letters changed from lower to upper case: Conti can total 56 and Tata 146, what can Kraton add up to?

Answer: The question was elementary but – and not or the first time in our series – had more than one solution: If CoNTi = 54 [Cobalt (27) + Nitrogen (7) + Titanium (22)] and TaTa = 146 [Tantallum (73) + Tantallum (73) = 146] then Kraton could add up to 136 [Krypton (36) + Astatine (85) + Oxygen (8) + Nitrogen (7)]… or 123 [K=19, Ra=88, T(Tritium)=1, O=8, N=7].

Extra well done to this week’s very select group: David Mann, manager rubber technology, Béthune, France; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn,Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot,  Monmouthshire, UK.

 

Question 2: One a day

This week we used a different format: asking readers to identify the connection between four clues. A different clue appeared each day up to Thursday and readers were invited to provide a different guess/answer each day. The four clues were: Horace, Andre, 1898, Michelin.

Michelin-rolling-greenAnswer: The ‘connection’ has its origins at an exhibition in Lyon, France in 1894. There, Edouard Michelin pointed out to his brother Andre that a stack of tires on the company’s stand looked a bit like a person. In 1898, the concept was brought to poster artist Marius Rossillon, who drew a ‘tire-man’ – tires were then light in colour – onto a sample artwork for a brewery carrying the words ‘Nunc est Bibendum’ (now is the time to drink). The slogan, from an ode by Roman poet Horace, stayed with the new poster and soon after gave rise to the Michelin man’s famous name.

Strictly speaking our winner is Thierry Montcalm, who was first to answer ‘Bibendum’ – after the third clue. However, another star performer was David Mann, who answered Michelin after the very first clue. He switched to the Michelin man after day 2 and then Bibendum, on day 4. So, well done to everyone who replied with either of these answers: Thierry Montcalm, R&D Chemist Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune Cedex, France; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl, Italy; John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Ian. P. Jones, managing director, Continental Division, Contitech Power Transmission Group, ContiTech UK Ltd, Wigan, UK; Liz O’Donovan, AAtyremaster, Dublin, Ireland; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain. Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium. (Thanks to everyone who had a go: we saw a lot of great guesswork, ranging from various book and cartoon characters to ‘The Sound of Music’.)

 

Question 1: Credit cards?

Four playing cards, a 2, 3, 5 and 7 are placed face down on a table and mixed around.  To play you pay €10 and select two cards. You win €25 if the total on the two cards is nine. How much would you expect to win or lose if you played the game 16 times?

Answer: Things are rarely straightforward on the ERJ Brainteaser. The official answer is that you would lose €93.33 (€25 x (1/6) – €10) x 16). However, as some pointed out, it could be €66, if €25 was a ‘net win’. Anyway well done to: John Droogan, advanced polymers and composites, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire,UK; John D Burrows, consultant, France; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl, Italy; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand; and Chris Kelley, director, global planning and asset optimization, Cabot Corp., Boston, Massachusetts, US.

 

JANUARY 2017

Products_4

 

Competing at the highest levels is sometimes more about taking part rather than just winning all the time. Therefore, this month’s award goes to a long-time supporter of our Brainteaser competition: well done the Liz O’Donovan of AA Tyremaster, the first ERJ Brainiac of the Month of 2017.

 

Question 4: Nerdy number

In the rubber QC lab, boffin Hamish is analysing a test sample labelled with a six-digit number. On closer inspection, he finds that when it is multiplied by either 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 no new digits appear on the number on the label. What was the number?

Answer: The number is: 142857: Well done to John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire,UK; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand; John Droogan, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK. A couple of readers chipped in 000000 as an alternative answer, so well done also to; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; and Liz O’Donovan, AA Tyremaster Dublin, Ireland.

 

Question 3: Chocolate challenge

At a tire company cafeteria, the workers had a contest to see who could eat the most chocolate Santas left over from Christmas. After 20 minutes, all the Santas had been eaten. The foreman, who was keeping count, pointed out that there were seven times as many chocolates as workers and that each person had eaten a different number. And the shopfloor manager, who was acting as adjudicator, said she had noticed that when the workers had eaten one third of the Santas, there were 4 fewer than 10 times as many Santa ears as human noses in the contest.

Answer: Maybe a festive hangover, as there were only two correct replies to this fairly straightforward teaser: 42 Santas and 6 contestants. Well done to our top Brainiacs: Yuichi “Joe” Sano of Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd in Thailand; and Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada.

 

Question 2: Paintball puzzle

Mr. Black, Mr. Gray, and Mr. White are having a paint-ball shoot-out. They each take turns shooting at each other with one hit taking a rival out of the game. Black, who hits target 1/3 of the time, gets to shoot first. Gray, who scores 2/3 of the time, gets to go next, assuming he is still in the game. White, who hits target every, shoots next, assuming also that he has not been hit. The cycle repeats. If you are Mr. Black, where should you shoot first for the highest chance of survival?

Answer: Based on the options presented, he should fire at Mr White, as worked out by: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Alexander Mamikonyan, chief of Export Dept, Empils-zinc Ltd, Russia; John Droogan, MegaChem (UK) Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; and  Yuichi “Joe” Sano of Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd in Thailand.

The probabilities were neatly presented by Yuichi Sano as:

HIT(B->W)xMISS(G->B)+MISS(B->W)x(AIM(B)xMISS(G->B)+UNAIM)xUNAIM

1/3×1/3+2/3x(1/2×1/3+1/2)x1/2=1/3

HIT(B->G)xMISS(W->B)+MISS(B->G)x(AIM(B)xMISS(G->B)+UNAIM)xUNAIM

1/3×0+2/3x(1/2×1/3+1/2)x1/2=2/9

 

Question 1: Magic numbers

Find three magic number such that: The product of the three numbers is a prime; the 2nd number – 1st number = 3rd number – 2nd number.

Answer: Firstly Happy New Year to one and all and well done to the following readers who started 2017 on the right footing with the answer -3, -1, 1: John Droogan, MegaChem (UK), Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; and Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand

 

DECEMBER 2016

Yokohama-silent-tires-aero-YRC-600

There was tough competition all round in the final month of 2016, and after extremely lengthy deliberations by our judging panel, our ERJ Brainiac of the Month award has gone to joint winners:

Yuichi “Joe” Sano of Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd in Thailand; and Thierry Montcalm at Soucy Caoutchouc, Canada

 

Question 4: Anna’s event

For the best employee awards at her rubber company, events manager Anna is making tablecloths for circular tables 6 feet in diameter. The finished tablecloths need to hang down 5 inches over the edge of each table all the way around. To finish the edge of the tablecloths, Anna will fold under and sew down 1 inch of the material all around the edge. For each table, she is going to use a single piece of rectangular fabric that is 120 inches wide. What is the shortest length of fabric in inches, she could use to make a tablecloth without putting any separate pieces of fabric together.

Answer: The correct answer is 84 inches. Well done to John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune Cedex, France; Satyadip Saikia, no details given; David Mann, Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand; and Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada., Stephan Cortel, Mesnac,.USA.

Question 3: All at sea

From his luxury yacht, skipper Ian measures the angle of elevation of the top of a lighthouse as 18 degrees. He sails 600 metres directly towards the lighthouse and then measures the elevation of the top of the cliff as 50 degrees. What is the distance from the second position of the yacht to the top of the lighthouse and what is the height of the lighthouse?

Answer: Not such plain sailing for our readers this week, but the answers (rounded up) were: height, 268m and distance 350m. Well done to John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Yuichi “Joe” Sano,Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co. Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn,Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; and Stephan Cortel, Mesnac,.USA..

 

Question 2 – Six pack

If 6 plus 6 equals 14, what does 6 multiplied by 6 equal?

Answer: Well done to these select few readers who worked out that the figures were to the base 8, so that 6 x 6 = 44: David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune Cedex, France; John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK;  Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand; and John D Burrows, consultant, France; Duncan Thomson, general manager, Wuxi Elbe Polymer Technology Ltd, China.

 

Question 1: Factory fire

Janice, the fire officer at a rubber factory, notices a blaze in the extrusion area of the plant. From her list of all 142 employees at work that day, she phones two, alerts them, asks them to phone two more people before getting out of the factory. Luckily, everyone answered the phone immediately and got out safely – even though each phonecall took 30 seconds, and it took each employee 90 seconds to get out of the building. How long did it take to evacuate all 142 workers from the factory?

Answer: This was a tough one and generated answers ranging from between 3-8 minutes. However, the official answer is that its took nine rounds of phone calls to alert all 142 employees, which equated to 4 minutes 30 seconds, plus 90 seconds, ie 6 minutes, to fully evacuate the building. Extra well done to Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand; and Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada.

 

NOVEMBER 2016

Rockwell-generic-information-automation

This month’s award goes to David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune Cedex, France; who has been an excellent contributor to our brainteasers. Well done to our new ERJ Brainiac of the Month.

Question 4: Domenic’s Dilemma

Domenic does not know much about football but he is having a go at predicting the results of 7 matches in the English league next Sunday. What is the probability of him guessing the result (home win, away win or a draw) of every match correctly?

Answer:  Assuming that each match outcome has an equal probability, then for each of the 7 matches the chance of guessing the correct outcome is 1/3. Therefore, for 7 matches the answer is (1/3)^7 = 1/2187 or 0.05%. Well done to John D Burrows, consultant, France; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune Cedex, France; John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong, Thailand Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl, Italy; Maria Eugenia Aricha, BU Manager – plastic, composite & rubber, EMSA TechnologiaQuimica, Spain; Pete McNeil, Rubber & Plastics News, US.

Question 3: Ashwin’s art

A visit to the Tate Modern art gallery in London, has given Ashwin a new-concept idea for decorating the office. Next day, he brings in hundreds of small, individually numbered prints. With puzzled colleagues watching on, he takes out print no. 30 at 11 o’clock and hangs it on the wall. He repeats the exercise with print no. 240 at 4 o’clock, followed by print no. 315 at 7.30. Which number print will Ashwin hang up at 9.30?

Answer:  Yes the key was angles on the clockface, so at 9:30 he would hang no. 255.Well done to John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune Cedex, France;; Yuichi “Joe” Sano Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co. Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand;

 

Question 2:  T Time

A car fitted with ultra-high-performance tires travels from A to B, at a speed of 90km per hour. It takes it time ‘T’ to complete the journey.  A similar car, fitted with budget tires, travels from A to B at a speed of 70km per hour. This time, the journey takes ‘T+ 1 hour’.

How long did it take for the UHP tire-fitted car to complete its journey?’

Answer: Be warned: Our question-setter is threatening revenge after seeing replies to this question fly in almost as soon as Monday’s newsletter went out. The correct answer, 3.5h, reached us in the following order from: François Jouan, business developer, Konimpex Sp. Z O.O, Lyon, France; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune Cedex, France; John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl, Italy; Ronald Meyns, strategic account manager, Goodyear EMEA, Rockwell Automation, Hamburg, Germany; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong, Thailand; John D Burrows, consultant, France; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain.

 

Question 1: Bouncing Tire

A tire is dropped and bounces up to a height that is 75% of the height from which it was dropped. It then bounces again to a height that is 75% of the previous height and so on. How many bounces does it make before it bounces up to less than 25% of the original height from which it was dropped?

Answer: Quite a few readers worked this out at 4, but the correct answer is that on the 5th bounce it bounces up to 23,7%, which is less than 25% of the original height from which it was dropped. Well done to: David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France;; John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; François Jouan, business developer, Konimpex Sp. Z O.O, Lyon, France; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; John D Burrows, consultant, France; Ian. P. Jones, managing director, Continental Division, Contitech Power Transmission Group, ContiTech UK Ltd, Wigan, UK; Stephan N Cortel, Mesnac, USA; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co. Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand; Hans Derwig, managing director Dunlop Service, Drachten, The Netherlands; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl, Italy.

 

 

OCTOBER 2016

Novamont-bio-butadeine

 

This month’s award goes to one of our most consistent performers, who came in well ahead of the pack with the correct answer for question 4. Well done to Marzio Bussola of Parker Hannifin in Italy, our new Brainiac of the Month

Question 4: Meeting Point

A service centre in Paris has sent a replacement machine part by courier to reach a factory near Cologne in seven hours. At precisely the same time, the factory sent a courier with the old part, which needed to be refurbished, to Paris to reach the service centre in nine hours. If the distance was exactly 250 miles, how long was it before the couriers passed each other?

Answer: Ask a simple question and you get hundreds of different answers. Luckily that is not the case with this teaser as most of our readers came up the right answer, 3h 56 minutes 15 seconds, some adding the distances travelled by the two couriers before their paths met. Well done, in order of receipt, to: Marzio Bussola,  Parker Hannifin Manufacturing S.r.l., Italy; François Jouan, business developer, Konimpex Sp. Z O.O, Lyon, France; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; John D Burrows, consultant, France; John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; Ian. P. Jones, managing director, Continental Division, Contitech Power Transmission Group, ContiTech UK Ltd, Wigan, UK; Stephan N Cortel, Mesnac, USA; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Rayong Province, Thailand; Hugo Ernesto Vera, Adscripto Proyectos Expansión, FATE S.A.I.C.I., Buenos Aires, Argentina; Tony Neill, National Tyres and Autocare, UK; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK.

 

Question 3: Warehouse wonder

There are ‘n’ tires in a warehouse. Six of the tires are ultra-high performance tires. The rest are high performance. A worker takes a tire from the storage hall and fits it on a car. He then then takes at random another tire and fits on another car.  The probability that the worker has picked two UHP tires is 1/3. How many tires are there in the warehouse?

Answer: Good response to this teaser, and most correctly worked out the correct answer, 10: Well done to David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl, Italy; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co. Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Thailand;  John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; John D Burrows, consultant, France; Thiery Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; François Jouan, business developer, Konimpex Sp. Z O.O, Lyon, France. Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager,, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium; Maria Eugenia Aricha, Emsa Technologia Quimca, Barcelona, Spain.

 

Question 2: Bigger band

Four-member rock group the Kings of Oblivion has taken on a number of new recruits and transformed into a brass band. The reformed band’s first gig is at a football match, where it is to march onto the pitch in the formation of a solid equilateral triangle. The band members will then rearrange themselves to form a solid square. What is the minimum number of new recruits needed to do this?

Answer: The total number of band members needed is 36 – (triangle of 8 per side, square of 6 per side) so the number of new recruits is 32. Well done to David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France;  John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; John D Burrows, consultant, France; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; François Jouan, business developer, Konimpex Sp. Z O.O, Lyon, Francce. Aditya Biswas, automobile researcher, Segment Y, Goa, India.

 

Question 1: Tricky taps

At a US rubber chemicals plant, there are two taps on a reactor. One releases hot water, the other cold water, into the vessel, but at varying pressures. If the hot water is 105°F and the cold water is 45°F, and operators can rotate the tap at most 360 degrees, how much would they have to rotate the cold water tap to get the temperature to be 98.6°F, if the hot water is turned on all the way, and could not be turned down?

Answer: This question had too many twists for many, with only a handful of elite answerers accurately turning the tap 43 degrees [(105+45*x/360)/(1+x/360)=98.6]. Extra well done, so, to: John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl, Italy; John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Caldicot, UK; Anthony Cutler, OTR Global, Australia; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co. Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn Thailand; François Jouan, business developer, Konimpex Sp. Z O.O, Lyon, France.

 

SEPTEMBER 2016

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Every now and then our judging panel chooses to award our top ‘prize’ to a promising new entrant. So, for weighing in first with the correct answers to our last two Brainteasers, well done to: François Joua of Konimpex, our new Brainiac of the Month

 

Question 4: Double back

What is the smallest number, besides 1, that is one less than twice its digits reversed?

Answer: No problem, as long as you read this one carefully. Well done to all who answered 73: François Joua, business developer, Konimpex Sp. Z O.O, Lyon, France; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl, Italy; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn,Thailand; Stephan N Cortel, Mesnac, USA; Hugo Ernesto Vera, adscripto, proyectos expansion, FATE S.A.I.C.I., Buenos Aires, Argentina; Shinichi ‘Steve’ Yoshida, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn,Thailand.

 

Question 3: 60 in 60

It takes six technicians to change six tires in six minutes. How many technicians does it take to change 60 tires in 60 minutes?

Answer Most people saw through this straight away, though one of the first replies in said the question was too easy, but gave the wrong answer! Anyway, well done to all of the following readers who correctly answered 6: François Jouan, business developer, Konimpex Sp. Z O.O, Lyon, France; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl, Italy; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co. Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Rayong Province, Thailand; John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, UK; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy Caoutchouc, Québec, Canada; Hugo Ernesto Vera, Adscripto, Proyectos Expansión, FATE S.A.I.C.I., Buenos Aires, Argentina; Tony Cutler, OTR Global, Australia; Dr Mohamed Hassan, R&T executive director Mesnac Americas Co. Ltd, Akron, Ohio, USA; Shinichi ‘Steve’ Yoshida, SSWT, Japan; Himesh Shah, Sonil Ventilfabrik, GIDC Indl. Estate, Jamnagar, India; Anton Markin, senior financial analyst EMEA, Goodyear, Diegem, Belgium.

 

Question 2: Next number

What is the next number in the following sequence 5, 10, 26, 50, 122…?

Answer: Well done to readers who saw through this thinly disguised prime-number sequence and worked out the answer at 170: Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Rayong Province, Thailand; John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, Monmouthshire, UK; David Mann. manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl,  Italy; Stephan N Cortel, Mesnac, USA. Chris Kelly, Cabot Corp.

 

Question 1: Four-digit dilemma

What four-digit number has digit 1 three less than digit 4, which is one more than digit 2, which is twice digit 3, which is not a prime number and is one more than one-third of digit 4?

Answer: Code-breaking seems to be a strong-point among ERJ readers, judging at least by those who came up with the correct answer 6849. Quickest to reply were: Michael Simpson, research and development engineer, Trelleborg Industrial AVS, Leicester, UK: Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Dave Lawson, product change coordinator, HTV Elastomers, Polymers & Engineered Materials (Healthcare), Dow Corning Ltd, Barry, UK; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl, Italy; John Bowen, rubber industry consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; François Jouan, business developer, Konimpex Sp. ZOO, Lyon, France; David Mann, manager Rubber Technology, SI Group, Béthune Cedex, France;  Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Rayong Province, Thailand; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy International Inc., Québec, Canada; Stephan N Cortel, MESNAC, USA.

 

August 2016

Smart-Materials_freudenberg

If we do have a prize for the overall winner at the end of this year (this is under discussion), one of the top candidates will be Yuichi “Joe” Sano, who outperformed the field throughout August – not least with Question 5 – to become our new Brainiac of the Month

 

Question 5: Flora & fauna

Which Rio Olympics medal-winning countries have an image or representation of a living organism in their national flags, and what was the total number of medals won by these countries?

Answer: If there were marks going for style and effort, the clear winner would be Ian Jones, managing director, Contitech, Power Transmission Group, ContiTech United Kingdom Ltd, Wigan, UK, who supplied this excellent table. However, we took the liberty of adding a few extra medal-winning countries (in red) missing from the original table. The additions brought the medal total to 89, as answered only by Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Rayong Province, Thailand. Fine efforts also by Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain and John Bowen, rubber industry consultant, UK.

Country Organism Medals
Albania Eagle 0
American Samoa Eagle 0
Andorra Cows 0
Belize Humans & tree 0
Bermuda Lion 0
Bhutan Dragon 0
Bolivia Bird & flowers 0
British Virgin Islands Human (St Ursula) 0
Canada Maple leaf 22
Cayman Islands Lion & turtle 0
Croatia Goat, pine marten, leopard heads 10
Cyprus Olive branches 0
Dominica Parrot 0
Dominican Republic Bay laurel branch 1
Ecuador Eagle 0
Egypt Eagle 3
El Salvador Laurel Garland 0
Equatorial Guinea Tree 0
Eritrea Olive branch 0
Fiji Lion, dove, coconut palm, sugar case 1
Grenada Nutmeg pod 1
Guam Palm tree 0
Hong Kong White petals 0
Kazakhstan Golden eagle 17
Kiribati Frigate bird 0
Lebanon Tree 0
Mexico Eagle, serpent, cactus 5
Moldova Eagle 1
Montenegro Golden eagles 0
Papua New Guinea Bird of paradise 0
Serbia Eagle 8
Spain Lion 17
Sri Lanka Lion 0
Turkmenistan Green field & Olive branches 0
Uganda Crane 0
US Virgin Islands Bird & leaf 0
Venezuela Horse & leaves 3
Zambia Eagle 0

Note: After much debate, our judging panel decided that the P0lish flag with a coat of arms was not that country’s official flag.

 

Question 4: Three-person painting puzzle

Ashwin is painting the office reception area. He can do the job in 3 hours 40 minutes. Half way through he is joined by Hamish, who paints half as fast as Ashwin. Then 3 hours into the job, Alan starts lending a hand, painting at half the speed of Hamish. How long did it take to paint the reception?

Answer: A few twists and turns to this teaser but not enough to stop our expert readers working out the correct answer:  3 hours 2 minutes 51 seconds. Well done to: John Bowen, rubber industry consultant, Bromsgrove, UK; François Jouan, business developer, Konimpex Sp. Z O.O, Lyon, France; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy International Inc., Québec, Canada; Stephan Cortel, Mwesnac, USA; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co. Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong Province, Thailand; Aditya Biswas, automobile researcher, Segment Y; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl, Italy.

 

Question 3: Rock of ages

Ageing rock group the Kings of Oblivion have worked out their takings from a weekend concert at €95, There were 100 tickets sold, with students paying €0.50; over 60′s,  €2.50; and all others charged £10 each, How many students, over 60′s, and ‘all others’ went to the concert?

Answer: Less mind-bending that the rock group’s name suggests: the answer was 85 students (€42,50), 13 over 60’s (€32,50) and 2 ‘all others’ (€20). Well done to: Ronald Meyns, strategic account manager, Goodyear EMEA, Rockwell Automation, Hamburg, Germany; John Bowen, rubber industry consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy International Inc., Québec, Canada; Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co. Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Rayong Province, Thailand; Karl Heinz Sandholzer, product management vice president, Saurer Germany GmbH & Co. KG, Kempten, Germany; Michael Easton, sales and marketing director, Globus, Manchester, UK; Michael Simpson, research and development engineer, Trelleborg Industrial AVS, Leicester, UK.

 

Question 2: Rigged test

Brainteaser Rigged test

At a rubber gasket manufacturer’s QC lab, a 60cm-diameter ring, made from 2cm-thick metal rod, is fixed horizontally on a test-rig and 8cm balls are dropped randomly from a container above. The test is to see if each ball is more likely to hit the ring or fall through without hitting it. Which outcome is more likely?

Answer: Not too many on target here:. Each ball is more likely to hit the ring When Ring ID=60cm: the white area= 44x44xpai/4; the blue area=(80×80-44×44)xpai/4. The blue area, so, is much bigger than the white area, so  each ball has more chance to hit the ring than to go through  the ring.

Very well done to Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Thailand (many thanks for the diagram); and John Bowen, rubber industry consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire,UK.

 

 

Question 1: High five

To celebrate five years in business, the manager of a rubber manufacturing company decides to order pizzas, in the shape of a regular pentagon, for the staff. The local pizzeria gives him two choices: pizzas with 5-inch sides at €6.00 each or those with 7-inch sides for €7.50. Which size is the best value for money?

Answer: The total area of pentagon with 5” side is approx. 43 SQ in, therefore cost is 600/43 = €0-14/SQ in. Total area of pentagon with 7” side is approx. 84 SQ in, therefore cost is 750/84 = €0-09/SQ in. Pizza with 7” sides is best value. Well done to: John Droogan, UK business manager, MegaChem UK Ltd, UK, John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Karl Heinz Sandholzer, product management vice president, Saurer Germany GmbH & Co. KG, Kempten, Germany; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy International Inc, Québec, Canada; Stephan N Cortel, Mesnac, USA, Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Thailand; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Wanda Welch, research & development manager, ecore international, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA.

 

July 2016

BARROSO-MG, 27/08/2015SEMPERTRANSPhotos of the Flying belt system installed at Holcim Barosso Cement Manufacturing Plant. The flying belt system was ordered by Holcim at Agudio, which Sempertrans delivered the Conveyor Belt. Flying belt is an aerial transport system for bulk materials on ropes with conveyor belt.Foto: Bruno Figueiredo / çrea de Servio

A clear result this time: while Question 1 left almost everyone floundering, our winner worked steadily though the maths and was first to identify the binary sequence behind the series of numbers. Extra well done to UK rubber industry consultant John Bowen, our new Brainiac of the Month.

 

Question 4: Presidential puzzle

The five candidates seeking to be elected president of a new rubber industry association have attracted a total of 320 votes. How many votes did the lowest placed candidate receive if the winner’s margin over the other four was 9, 13, 18 and 25?

Answer: If 320 = x + (x-9) + (x-13) + (x-18) + (x-25) then x = 385/5 = 77 and the candidate who came last got (77-25) 52 votes. Our quiz poll toppers this week are: Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co. Ltd, Tambol Mabyangporn, Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong, Thailand; Marzio Bussola, Parker Hannifin Manufacturing Srl – Italy; Amparo Botella, Ismael Quesada SA, Spain; Thierry Montcalm, R&D chemist, Soucy International Inc., Québec, Canada; John Bowen, consultant, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK; Ian. P. Jones,  managing director, Continental Division Contitech, Power Transmission Group, ContiTech United Kingdom Ltd, Wigan, UK; Inna Stein, trading, RCMA Europe BV, Zaandam, The Netherlands; Karl Heinz Sandholzer, product management, vice president, Saurer Germany GmbH & Co. KG, Kempten, Germany; Mohamed Hassan, R&T executive director, MESNAC Americas Co., Ltd, Akron, Ohio, USA;  Stephen Fulton, R&D technology development manager, Umicore Specialty Materials Brugge NV, Brugge, Belgium.

 

Question 3: What’s common?

What do ERJ, LA and Eric Blair have in common?

Answer: They contributed to the first time an ERJ brainteaser failed to receive a “completely” correct answer. The answer was 84 – reference to ERJ’s first issue in 1884, Los Angeles 1984 Olympics and the famous work of Eric Blair (George Orwell) 1984.

Some, including Jon Cutler, materials development manager, Trelleborg Sealing Solutions Tewkesbury, UK; David Mann, manager rubber technology, SI Group, Béthune, France and John Burrows, a consultant to the tire and rubber reinforcement industries came close by coming up with the figure 1984, while Yuichi “Joe” Sano of Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co. Ltd pointed to ERJ’s 100th anniversary in 1984.

 

Question 2: Mazy manager

The boss of a large rubber chemicals plant commissions a landscape gardener to plant lines of high bushes at the factory site. The gardener first plants a line running 100 paces east. From the end of that line he plants a line 100 paces north, then 100 west, 98 south, 98 east, 96 north, 96 west, and so on. This made a square spiral path 2 paces wide. How long is the path, if the chemicals boss walks down the middle of it?

Answer: Readers seem to have taken different approaches to this problem, but the official answer is 5,000 paces, as only Yuichi “Joe” Sano  of Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co. Ltd worked out:

99+98+98+96+96+94+94———-+6    +6  +4  +4   +2  +2  +1

+) 1  +2  +2  +4  +4   +6   +6 ———-+94+94+96+96+98+98+99

————————————————————————————–

100+100+100+100+100+100——–+100+100+100+100+100

=100×100=10000

10000/2=5000

 

Question 1: You cannot be series

In the sequence 1, 3, 7, 15, 31, 63 what do the numbers have in common, apart from the obvious arithmetical progression?

Answer: Our quiz-master was joyful at the start of the week, having seemingly stumped all of the best brains in the global rubber industry. That was until leading UK consultant John Bowen – though he said his head was left hurting –  and, a couple of days later, John Droogan, UK business manager at MegaChem UK Ltd, identified this as the binary sequence: 1,11,111,1111,11111, 111111, Others got there after  a few attempts or came close with (2 to the power of n) -1. So well done also to: Yuichi “Joe” Sano, Sumiden Steel Wire (Thailand) Co., Ltd, Thailand ; Biswajit Paul, global product technology manager, Birla Carbon -  Rubber Carbon Black Business, India; John D Burrows, consultant, France; and Stephan N Cortel, Mesnac, USA.

 

Previous Brainteaser Results